Please note: The articles here provide only an overview and do not constitute legal advice. Do not make any decisions based on reading any of these articles alone. Specific legal advice suited to the reader is strongly advised.

Uber and Toronto Dominion : How Toxic Culture Can Cost Billions

March 30, 2017 Lai-King Hum Corporate culture is a critical part of success. Create a toxic culture and you will pay a price. This is one of the lessons for the recent human resource disasters at TD Bank and Uber. Each reflects the danger for companies, large and small, when…

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"You are not a good fit for us" - expert evidence and systemic discrimination in the workplace

Lai-King Hum[1] A. INTRODUCTION Violations of the right to be protected against discrimination under the Human Rights Code (“Code”) are often rooted in prejudices or assumptions about a person’s abilities, capabilities and potential.   In the workplace, reasons such as “you are not a good fit for us”, “we hired someone…

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“Should I stay or should I go?” – and other mitigation questions

Six Minutes Employment Lawyer 2016 Author: Lai-King Hum[1] May 4, 2016 Included in almost every defence to a wrongful dismissal claim is a failure on the part of a dismissed employee to mitigate the loss of his or her employment. This obligation to mitigate usually refers to the obligation of employees who…

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Taking a Closer Look at Human Rights Commission Policy Directives: Policy on removing the "Canadian experience" barrier and Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions

This paper will discuss and take a closer look at the two policy directives from the perspective of employment law and the regulation of professions: the Policy on removing the “Canadian experience” barrier (“Canadian Experience Policy”) and the Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions (“Mental Health Policy”).

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“Canadian experience required”: prohibited discrimination or being discriminating about standards?

It is the classic Catch-22 situation: you need Canadian experience to get a job in Canada, and you need a job in Canada to get Canadian experience. Whether job-hunting or applying for professional accreditation in Ontario, the “Canadian experience” conundrum gives rise to a seeming paradox.

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